Dear Tenant Who Lives Above Le Divan Orange…

divan-orange
19Nov

I hate to break it to you, but you’re a bit of a douche.

You can’t decide to live DIRECTLY ABOVE a music venue and then complain about the noise.

You just can’t.

And to make it easier for people to identify others like you as douches, here are some helpful clues.

If you live at the corner of St. Laurent and Rachel (above Parc des Ameriques) and complain about the two-week Montreal Fringe Fest period and the noise from the bands and the congregating that takes place there, you’re a bit of a douche.

If you decide to live on St. Laurent, Mont Royal, St. Denis, or any of the major urban gathering commercial hot spots with a variety of well-placed cafes, restaurants, and bars, and then complain about the inevitable noise coming from patrons and the late-night coming and goings, you’re a bit of a douche.

If you decide to live near the train tracks or the Turcot Interchange because you enjoy the affordability of rents and/or the proximity to numerous services, but then complain about the noise, you’re a bit of a douche.

If you decide to buy a house near the airport because the prices are way cheaper in that area (because… you guessed it… the noise!) and then you complain about… the noise, you’re a bit of a douche.

Also, all kinds of clueless.

So let me fill you in on the facts of life.

You can’t get something for nothing.

It’s just not how life works, no matter how hard you seem to want to make it happen.

Nothing annoys me more than the absence of common sense, and no one exhibits that more than the newly arrived urban dweller who wants the luxury of enjoying all the pleasures and conveniences of living in the city without having to deal with the inconveniences that come with that decision.

You, my fellow urbanite, living in your new gentrified digs, enjoying the comfort of having everything cool and hip and happening at your fingertips, can’t possibly attempt to shut all that down when it interferes with nap time.

There is a price to pay for living downtown or in the latest “in” neighbourhoods, and that price is usually noise, tough-to-get-to parking spots, and an endless supply of tattooed baristas and hipster beards.

If you like what the neighbourhood brings you, you deal. You learn to live with it, you shake your shoulders and focus on something else, because being a reasonable person, you understand that there’s always a price to pay for what you gain in return.

If you’re not reasonable, you decide to move DIRECTLY ABOVE a live music venue and then complain about the noise.

On a personal level, attacks and/or threats to the survival of live music venues offend me to no end. Not because I’m a musician (I can’t play a single note and I’m pretty sure I’ll die not having learned to play one), but because I have an immense appreciation and love for live music and for starving artists who hone their craft (a real labour of love) playing in small venues like Le Divan Orange or my neighbourhood’s Bar de Courcelle.

Over the years, I have seen some amazing acts perform at these places and I would like to hope that I will continue to see performances take place there. I don’t want the viability and existence of these venues (and venues like them) threatened by the demands of the perpetually clueless.

Live music is something this city simply doesn’t have enough of. We need more venues, not less of them. And I certainly don’t want them threatened or shut down because some douche decided to move to one of the busiest and loudest commercial streets in Montreal and expect that she can enjoy the bucolic sounds of a small countryside road.

We need to nourish and protect our music scene and everything that makes this city great; not cower to the whims of people who would rather choke off grass-root music scenes and urban rejuvenation because they suddenly realized it’s a tad louder than originally expected.

Soundproof your apartment or move somewhere quieter. I hear the South Shore has some amazing rentals.

  • mackle

    Way to miss the point, Toula. This is not a question of whether or not live music is good or bad.

    Did you even read the article? If the venue is receiving fines, it’s because they’re breaking the law. If they obeyed the city bylaws, then no fines. >>>Magic!

    Most live music venues in this city manage to run their shows without breaking the bylaws and incurring fines. You have to question the common sense of the owners who persist in testing the limits, at their own expense. Once, fine. Nine times?? Sorry, no sympathy here.

    Good job sneering at anyone who doesn’t meet your opinion of privileged cool:

    – South Shore residents,
    – rural inhabitants,
    – poor people (who, according to you, are exercising their choice to live by the train tracks because they “enjoy” the cheap rent),
    – those who lived in St Henri before people like you came along and gentrified it with your middle class hipster bars…

    It sounds like you’re a bit of a douche.

    • https://twitter.com/markjschilling freshacconci

      What article are you referring to? I guess I’m missing something, but I take it this article/rant is a response? Without knowing the full context, I’m still inclined to agree with you (mackle, that is). Those digs at cheap housing/rent by the tracks smack of middle-class privilege with no clue how the rest of the world works. I live in the Pointe across from the tracks. I chose to live there and I have the means to leave. Others in the neighbourhood are not so fortunate and the issues around train noise are more complex then “trains make noise, duh.”

      • Toula Drimonis

        The article is linked right into my article. Here it is again. http://www.ledevoir.com/culture/musique/424267/montreal-le-divan-orange-menace-par-des-plaintes-repetees-pour-bruit-excessif

        And you missed the part where I say “you decide to live by the train tracks” A choice, not a necessity. Big difference.

        • https://twitter.com/markjschilling freshacconci

          Well, with all due respect, not everyone gets to choose whether or not to live by the tracks. I chose it and I can afford to leave, so complaining about trains in the middle of the night would be silly. However, many in my neighbourhood can’t leave so easily and much of the train noise is illegal and citizens’ groups are fighting it. So, complaining about noise is sometimes necessary. Living above a bar? That’s usually a choice, so no argument there.

          • Toula Drimonis

            But we’re not disagreeing! LOL
            I stipulated “decide to live by the train tracks” so as to distinguish between those who live there by choice and those who don’t.
            And of course there are legitimate noise concerns taking place everyday. I just don’t believe this is one of them.

    • SatJ

      You’re more than a bit of a douche. Venue has no problems for YEARS then some idiot chooses to live above a venue on St. Laurent – there are plenty of other places this person could have lived, in fact people pay a premium to live on St. Laurent because it is “privileged cool” – then this person proceeds to complain about the noise. Zero sympathy. This is nothing like any of your other examples. You’re an ass.

    • Toula Drimonis

      Sorry, but I think you’re missing all sorts of points here.

      Le Divan Orange has operated with no issues for over 10 years. The current tenant raising such a stink and feeling so inconvenienced just renewed their lease for another 4 years. I find it strange that someone who is suffering so badly from the noise is choosing to stay where they are. Don’t you?

      The South Shore was not mentioned as an example of uncool. It was mentioned as an example of a quiet place to live. Sure, it’s less trendy and it’s outside of the city, but it’s much more quieter and free of music venues. It’s all about choices. You detected sneering where there wasn’t any.

      PS. I live by the train tracks and I like it just fine, so I guess I’m one of the poor people you’re referring to.
      Cheers!

      • mackle

        Again, did you read the article?

        Did you read the part where it gives a logical explanation why the problem recently got much worse for the long-term tenant of 5 years, leading to an dramatic increase in complaints?

        Did you read the part where the acoustician the bar brought in to investigate and run tests gave an evaluation which “tend à donner raison à la plaignante.” ?

        Did you read the part where the City Councillor holds the venue responsible for the problem? “Christine Gosselin, estime que le Divan orange a aussi sa part de responsabilité dans ses récents déboires, n’ayant pas adapté son local au fur et à mesure de la croissance « organique » de l’établissement.”

        It’s too bad the Divan Orange has money problems. It’s too bad they (or the landlord) didn’t choose to upgrade the facility along the way to conform with accepted standards.

        I find it strange that a bar in such a precarious financial position would continue to _make choices_ to play music at a level that both an independant acoustician and police determine is loud enough to warrant fines, thus incurring fines they can’t afford. Don’t you?

        As you say, it’s all about choices, right?

        • Guest

          Toula wrote the article…

          • Harrison

            Obviously HE didn’t write the article.

          • MRR

            No, mackle is referring to the ORIGINAL article upon which Toula is commenting. It’s linked in the second line of her article with the word “complain”.

    • Dawn

      There is no law in Montreal regarding noise complaints like there is in other provinces. You can call in a noise complaint on anyone for anything at any time. The person living above a music venue bitching about the noise coming from a music venue is nothing more than an asshole. If you want it quiet, don’t live above a fucking music venue.

      • Aken

        You are totally wrong, I once been a roomate of a dude living above a place consisting of a dance floor with people learning to dance and all. He was complaining about the noise of the girls jumping on the floor. He naturally won and the society had to relocate. As easy as that.

        • Dawn

          I’m wrong about what exactly? That the guy is an asshole? That is a matter of opinion. The fact that there is NO law that protects ANYONE from a noise complaint isn’t a matter of opinion, and your asshole ex-roommate example proves it.

          We live in a society that should be dicatated by common decency, not who’s the loudest complainer.

          • Aken

            So everyone that doesnt fit your intolerant vision of the world is an asshole, nice. Btw read my post below, I explain my point in more details. You’ll learn about “common decency”.

          • Dawn

            Actually, no. People who consciously make an independent decision to go somewhere that doesn’t suit their needs and desires, and then bitch about it are assholes. I’m pretty specific in my definition. I’ve read your comment below already, and actually it disregards the entire fact that Divan Orange is a music venue that has a pretty specific location, and can’t just move at the drop of a hat because some neighbour moved in above them and bitches about the noise. That neighbour should have considered the neighbourhood and maybe not moved in there if they weren’t okay with the dynamics and noise of neighbourhood. The rent on St. Laurent isn’t that cheap. There are a lot of places a person could move and keep their standard of living, and even improve it by going somewhere quieter that would more than clear the cost of movers. This all could have been avoided though, IF THEY DIDNT MOVE THERE IN THE FIRST PLACE. DIVAN ORANGE ISNT NEW

          • Aken

            But why my roomate is an asshole then, since he was here way before the dance school ?
            Well you are going to tell me that it’s because you didnt know it was the case.
            So before treating everyone assholes like a basic retard, just consider this : you don’t know anything. You don’t know at all why the dude moved above the Divan Orange, You don’t know at all if he asked about the bar and what was informations given to him, you don’t know at all how actually loud is the noise objectively and how it is loud compared to the standard bar noise. you don’t know if he is complaining about people outise or music inside or both.
            Also, its not because people before were very tolerant with the noise that it makes these appartment the property of Divan Orange. I repeat here my previous point : Divan Orange doesnt own the whole bloc and must respect the others and the law.
            Many options exists,noise removers, buying the appartments above, moving, …

          • Dawn

            Retard. Wow. Okay. If you can’t figure that one out on your own…

            You make a lot of assumptions about me that are false and bitch that I’m making assumptions, when in fact, I’m not making any assumptions.

            When were they having classes? At 6am? 10pm? No, they weren’t. You live in a city, and you accept the fact that other people around you are going to make noise.

            My first point was that Montreal HAS NO LAWS regarding noise, therefore the complainer is always right. In the rest of civilization bars get permits for noise at certain hours, and NOBODY can file a noise complaint before a set hour–which is something around 11pm. This protects people/businesses from yes, assholes, who move somewhere they know it isn’t going to be quiet and then bitch about it.

            Divan Orange was there first.

          • Aken

            If you can read french, here is a fair article with some interesting elements. Way more neutral piece of knowledge that this trash article above, I can garanty.

            http://www.ledevoir.com/culture/musique/424267/montreal-le-divan-orange-menace-par-des-plaintes-repetees-pour-bruit-excessif

          • Tank

            “My first point was that Montreal HAS NO LAWS regarding noise, therefore the complainer is always right.”

            http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/sel/sypre-consultation/afficherpdf?idDoc=22845&typeDoc=1
            http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/pls/portal/docs/PAGE/ARROND_RPP_FR/MEDIA/DOCUMENTS/CODIFICATION_BRUIT_2014.PDF

            Stop insulting please

          • Jean-François Lapierre

            I have been busking for almost 30 years in Montreal, then lately it became very annoying to go through auditioning, paying a permi t (IF you are good enough and allowed to do so) then in most places I used to play for years, front of warshaw on St-Laurent, corner Marianne on St-Denis, and on Mont-Royal mostly it became impossible to play more than half an hour before cops showing up and asking me to leave because of complaints, even if people try to tell policemen that I was doing a great job, not too loud, filling up the terrasses around and attracting clients to hang around and then spend money in boutiques and restaurants. Now I am done with Montreal, and most nice places are closed, where I used to play you will mostly see agressive panhandlers, cops dont bother them then why play music I should have sold all instruments and instead of proudly try to embellish the ambiance I would have done better sitting on the sidewalk with a paper cup… I moved to Gatineau and I feel way much better playing in Ottawa, make much more money and police protects me from beggars and thieves, just the other way around than in Montreal.

      • MRR

        Montreal definitely has noise by-laws. Where are you getting the impression that it doesn’t?

        Take note of this section in the original article: “En vertu du règlement municipal sur le bruit, les forces de l’ordre se sont déplacées près d’une trentaine de fois. Au total, le Divan orange a reçu neuf constats d’infraction, parfois en plein jour pendant les tests de son, parfois le soir pendant les concerts. La plupart des amendes s’élèvent à 1250 $, et seront contestées.”

  • Yan Chatel

    I do agree that if you move just ON TOP of a music venue and then complain because of the noise, NO MATTER what style of music it is, you are a TOTAL douche.

    Come on Divan Orange, book a nice death metal live show now!

  • Sophie Ferrandino

    I LOVE YOU Toula, thank you!

  • Maurin Arellano Frellick

    You are a douche

  • Gabrielle

    I agree with everything you said, except this part:

    “If you decide to live on St. Laurent, Mont Royal, St. Denis, or any of
    the major urban gathering commercial hot spots with a variety of
    well-placed cafes, restaurants, and bars, and then complain about the
    inevitable noise coming from patrons and the late-night coming and
    goings, you’re a bit of a douche.”

    If bars in Manhattan and New Orleans (outside of upper Bourbon Street) can keep their patrons quiet when they are outside taking a break or having a smoke, so can bars/concert venues in Montreal. If someone can’t walk home drunk without loudly telling their friends about that girl giving them the stink eye in the line for the bathroom FOR THE 4TH TIME, THEY are the douche. If an establishment can’t ask its patrons to keep quiet while out on the patio or the sidewalk after 11pm, they are the douche.

    • Toula Drimonis

      Gabrielle, I know what you’re trying to say, and yes.. one definitely hopes that bars will tell their patrons to be respectful and keep it down. Although, we all know it’s hard for people who are drunk to often follow such advice, and the inevitable noise is simply part of the price one pays for living in such areas.
      Also, since you brought up New Orleans (one of my favourite cities in the entire world), one of my all-time favourite memories, is sitting on the porch one summer night in the Bywater/Marigny District, listening to Kermit Ruffians’ trombone wail from the jazz bar next door.
      The sound was loud and clear and could be heard blocks away, but no one complained about the noise. Why? Probably because you can’t live in that neighbourhood, with a bar in the middle of it, and expect not to hear music coming from the venue. It’s just not realistic.

      • Gabrielle

        That is why I said I agreed with everything BUT that part. I would never complain about hearing music ANYWHERE. Hell, if I can sleep through Bonnaroo, I can sleep through anything.

        But I lived in the D.H. Holmes apartments on Iberville and Bourbon, I lived on St. Ann between Bourbon and Burgundy, and no one in NOLA would ever complain about hearing music playing, but at the same time, no bar owner, uptown, downtown or anywhere, would ever tolerate drunks loitering outside either. There are signs stapled everywhere asking patrons to keep it quiet for their neighbors because they know that the residents are what are keeping the areas alive and thriving.

        You can walking the lower quarter on a Friday night and not hear a peep except a bone playing somewhere in the distance… I feel like that common courtesy is sometimes lacking in Montreal…

        • Toula Drimonis

          Thanks for the clarifications, Gabrielle.
          Now you just made me miss NOLA. :-)

    • Gabriel Meunier

      she call at 2pm when we start the soundcheck , and after she call at least 6 time everyday even when they have 50 person and a smooth folk show ….

  • Bri

    The irony is you pay more to live where all the action is.

  • noahtron

    BDC is good times.

  • Aken

    I really love the Divan Orange, but I believe that respecting others is first to every human interaction. So, to add moral considerations to the more than correct Mackle point, if your neighbors are complaining about noise, just buy some fucking noise removers or move your activity away from simple people that can not afford to move or invest in noise treatment ? As commercial entity, Divan Orange has to take its responsability and act so they don’t monopolise the whole bloc with their activity…

  • HabZRules

    I’m not sure why you wrote “Directly above” when it’s 2 floors up, this changes the whole premiss of your article. Of course if you live 2 floors up you’re entitled to think there will be less/no noise. Now i’m not saying the person is right or wrong, nobody can because we don’t live there. But to say she should expect noise because she’s directly above is untrue.

  • Leila Marshy

    Great piece. And may I add: If you live in Outremont or Mile End and you complain about the Hasidim then you’re a bit of a douche.

  • Jean-Carle Hudon

    I tend to agree with Toula : choosing to rent an appartment above a bar with live music in an area known for live entertainment venues should normally indicate a willingness to live with the normal consequences. However,having read the article in Le Devoir, it should be pointed out that the acoustics testing revealed that the appartment directly above the club was empty and acted a bit like a drum, amplifying the noise level, which could explain why the complainant was acting now, and had not acted all those years that the second floor was occupied. It seems to me that a bit of renovation could solve this problem as there are great noise insultions available on the market, and flooring materials also that can go a long way in reducing noise levels. Maybe the owner of the building should consider pitching in as he does rent the upper levels as living quarters while at the same time renting the lower level as a music venue, maybe the upstairs tennant could look to friendlier ways to approach problem solving than calling in the Men in Blue, maybe Le Divan could hold a fund raiser to get funds which would be devoted to renovation… I think we should be looking for solutions which will help the Montreal music scene

  • Jean-Carle Hudon

    please correct :noise ”insulations” and not ”insultions”

  • Alexie Bombache

    The same thing happened with Café Sarajevo, better known for making all generations and nations dance together till the wee hours on weekends. But… the neighbors complained, even if the place had been a live music venue for over 20 years. Then, there was Le Roi du Plateau, a portuguese grill known for its famous bbq chicken, who had to move out because a new tenant from the newly built condos at the ex-Paris-Star factory complained about the toxicity of the charcoal from the grill (but who never complained about car pollution).
    And before that, there was l’Octogone, a dancing bar with marina and swimming pool by the river. After over 50 years in operation, it had to close in the 1990s because new rich neighbors wanted to sleep in peace.
    At the rate, with individual rights outweighing collective ones, and collective spaces being sold to private dwellers, one has to wonder what Montreal will look like in 20 years from now. A suburban dormitory? Will our new urbanity then tolerate that which once made Montreal a vibrant city to live in?

  • John Faithful Hamer

    Oh, the noise! Oh, the noise! Noise! Noise! Noise!

    That’s one thing he hated! The NOISE! NOISE! NOISE! NOISE!

    . . . the more the Grinch thought of the Who-Christmas-Sing.

    The more the Grinch thought, “I must stop this whole thing!”

    —Dr. Suess, How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1957)

  • HabZRules

    Toula what article are you referring 2?!

    You choose to forget important facts about the story and it’s pissing me off.
    It’s a bad article you wrote with clearly no intention on reporting the facts before explaining an opinion that is defendable, but has NOTHING to do with the situation in question.

    People are making fun of that lady because of you, but her situation is not as you explained, I wish everyone would read the original article that you’re referring 2 before posting “Well said” and “Good Job” ….

    You shouldn’t waste your time writing bullshit

  • Harrison

    There are a lot of bars in Montreal with live music every week, I don’t see why you think there are not enough of them.

    As for the recent change of heart by the tenant, I can’t speak from experience of going to this place but I definitely have see a trend of bands/bars BLASTING their amps way too loud to the point where I have tinnitus when I leave. Maybe that is the case? Where what used to be a nice background suddenly started to become unrelenting racket (Gotta remember he’s hearing this stuff through the floor).

    • Harrison

      You mentioned to another commenter that the sound could be heard from streets away – that’s too loud. You really don’t need it to be that loud to appreciate the music.

      C’mon

  • Lu Ke

    Anyone remember ‘green room’ RIP

  • Adrian ARs

    I think its a matter of perspective. At what time of the day this complains take?. About what?. If the bar is playing live music after 12 am then I think they have to compromise to not do that. I agree that in Montreal we have to many abusive stupid rules about noise and other things. It seems that more and more somebody can call the police and file a complain for whatever stupid reason they are bothered with when a conversation would solve the problem. Tula’s logic is has a basic flaw and it is the “if you move in top of a bar don’t complain about noise” so by that logic you are saying anything “illegal” is ok if theres a group of people who say so. Like you and the people who like this bar. What about the other person?. What if they decide to do more noise than you during a show and ruins it?. Would that be correct?. I mostly agree with you that with common sense everything can be resolved, but I also like to play devils advocate.

  • Hugues M

    I lived above a bar for 3 years in Victoria BC. It was a great open loft, but it came with gorillas at 3am in the street every friday and saturday, deafening bass, occasional vomit and piss in the door downstairs. It was really annoying yes at times. But reading this I realize that not once I thought of complaining to the city. Not. Once. Never even entered my mind. Or to call the cop. Why? Because I’m not a douche I guess! =)
    +1 agreed what what this writer says….

  • disqus_iF4f8ydOln

    super stupid venue anyway. who cares?

  • man-dome

    mackle, aken, HabZRules Gabrielle non of your opinions matter because your totally missing the point. this person lives in city. cities are loud. when there is construction by your place and the jack hammers go off at 7am, and your sleeping, are you going to go and tell the workers to quite down? No, you wouldn’t, you know why? Because you would probably get your little spoiled little brat ass kicked into the gutter. Have you ever been to a live music show? It’s not like listening to a cd player where you can turn it down at any moment. It’s some form of a rock band and bands are loud no matter how you cut it. So if they were there for 10 years and some person moves in and starts complaining. if i were a loser like that person, the first thing i would’ve have realized is that the apartment is a LIVE MUSIC VENUE. have you ever been on saint laurent on a friday or saturday night? it’s ridiculous. Im too old for all that noise but i like to live in the city, especially this one The reason being cause i feel that it is still a city that is alive and vibrant. So, you know what i did. I got a place a block or two from the a main strip. i sleep like a baby every night. Also to the other people who said that some people can’t choose where they live. sure that might be the case but if you can decide and have the resources to live on S.L and rachel then sorry but you do have a choice of where you live. this person could have lived a block or two over but they didn’t. It’s like deciding to work at a movie theatre and complaining that the smell of popcorn is too strong. Not only do i have no sympathy for this person, i hope they give her a ticket for ignorance. one more thing, 100 people are at a show discovering new music having a great time. 1 person take it away. that 1 person not having any insight as to how they are affecting other people. Divan orange are not breaking any laws. I think the tenant should be given a ticket every time they call the police to complain. That way they will learn where to live next time. And i hope this person doesn’t get to sleep ever for being so dumb. You make a campfire in rain it gonna be smoky, you wear slippers in the winter your feet are going to be cold, you decide jump in the pond at jarry park when your drunk your might smell like dog piss the, you drink too much, you puke, you eat too much beans you become a fart machine, you smoke all your life you have a good chance of getting cancer and dying. You drink your hot tea to fast, you’ll burn your tongue, YOU MOVE ON TOP OF A MUSIC VENUE, ON ONE OF THE MOST NOISIEST STREETS IN FUCKING CANADA, NOT TO MENTION THE STREET WITH THE HIGHEST CONCENTRATION OF BARS IN THE CITY, YES IT MIGHT BE A TAD TOO FUCKING LOUD. PISS ON YOU. I’VE SPENT MY LIFE TRYING TO EXPLAIN SIMPLE THINGS TOO MEGALOMANIACAL DOUCHBAGGGGGGGGGS!!!!! FUCK IT! NO MORE MISTER NICE GUY. I HATE YOU!

    • MRR

      There are by-laws that prevent jack hammers from drilling before 7am in many municipalities.

      The issue isn’t just that the music is loud; the issue is that the loudness is in violation of Montreal by-laws.

  • man-dome

    mackle, aken, HabZRules Gabrielle non of your opinions matter because your totally missing the point. this person lives in city. cities are loud. when there is construction by your place and the jack hammers go off at 7am, and your sleeping, are you going to go and tell the workers to quite down? No, you wouldn’t, you know why? Because you would probably get your little spoiled little brat ass kicked into the gutter. Have you ever been to a live music show? It’s not like listening to a cd player where you can turn it down at any moment. It’s some form of a rock band and bands are loud no matter how you cut it. So if they were there for 10 years and some person moves in and starts complaining. if i were a loser like that person, the first thing i would’ve have realized is that the apartment is a LIVE MUSIC VENUE. have you ever been on saint laurent on a friday or saturday night? it’s ridiculous. Im too old for all that noise but i like to live in the city, especially this one The reason being cause i feel that it is still a city that is alive and vibrant. So, you know what i did. I got a place a block or two from the a main strip. i sleep like a baby every night. Also to the other people who said that some people can’t choose where they live. sure that might be the case but if you can decide and have the resources to live on S.L and rachel then sorry but you do have a choice of where you live. this person could have lived a block or two over but they didn’t. It’s like deciding to work at a movie theatre and complaining that the smell of popcorn is too strong. Not only do i have no sympathy for this person, i hope they give her a ticket for ignorance. one more thing, 100 people are at a show discovering new music having a great time. 1 person take it away. that 1 person not having any insight as to how they are affecting other people. Divan orange are not breaking any laws. I think the tenant should be given a ticket every time they call the police to complain. That way they will learn where to live next time. And i hope this person doesn’t get to sleep ever for being so dumb. You make a campfire in rain it gonna be smoky, you wear slippers in the winter your feet are going to be cold, you decide jump in the pond at jarry park when your drunk your might smell like dog piss the, you drink too much, you puke, you eat too much beans you become a fart machine, you smoke all your life you have a good chance of getting cancer and dying. You drink your hot tea to fast, you’ll burn your tongue, YOU MOVE ON TOP OF A MUSIC VENUE, ON ONE OF THE NOISIEST STREETS IN FUCKING CANADA, NOT TO MENTION THE STREET WITH THE HIGHEST CONCENTRATION OF BARS IN THE CITY, YES IT MIGHT BE A TAD TOO FUCKING LOUD. PISS ON YOU. I’VE SPENT MY LIFE TRYING TO EXPLAIN SIMPLE THINGS TOO MEGALOMANIACAL DOUCHBAGGGGGGGGGS!!!!! FUCK IT! NO MORE MISTER NICE GUY. I HATE YOU!

    • Gabrielle

      Awwww, now you’ve gone and done it, you’ve made me mad you petulant little man-child you. You must think you’re so punk rock… If you had bothered to read both my comments, you would have noticed that I never complained about music (or maybe you did read them, but literacy is indeed in a sad state these days…) but about people not observing common courtesy and keeping quiet when they are outside afterhours.

      Before I forget, I do want to thank you for calling my ass little, even though I assure you it’s far from getting spoiled. I WAS worried it was getting too big but thanks to you, I can stop worrying now. But to get back to your point, when roadwork was being done in my neighborhood AT NIGHT for three days in a row a month ago, I did complain. Not to the workers because I understand that they have no saying in where and when they do the work but to the city who makes these decisions. And guess what? My little, non-spoiled ass was not kicked and the road work started getting done during the day.

      Last point, you want to talk about music, noise levels and music venues? Come at me bro. I’ve been in the concert industry for over 10 years. I’ve worked at the largest and loudest music festivals in North American and Europe. Tomorrowland? Check. Coachella? Check. Bonnaroo? Check. Austin City Limits? Check. I currently work at one of the busiest concert venues in Montreal. I have lived and worked in some of the most culturally vibrant cities in the world. Music and residents CAN cohabit. Venues can work at reducing noise levels and / or compensate residents for temporary situations. But thanks for the laugh, asking if I’ve ever been to a concert…

  • FreshRandy

    Hmm…people have the right to complain if they feel there is too much noise in their neighbourhood. It’s up to the authorities to decide if the complaint is valid and if so, what the consequences are to the offender. If it is not valid, then no foul right? Let’s try to resolve conflicts constructively instead of resorting to name calling? Smiles :) Ps i heart live music.

  • Carl Blanchet

    I think if you knowingly move above a known music venue, consciously, that there is a certain expectation that music will be playing there….noise happens on the plateau, its normal and will be as long as douche bags from the suburbs come into the city to spend their money , get wasted and shout profanities and kick the shit out of each other…it seems to be the north American tradition.

  • Ann Vézina

    You sound like a douche yourself putting making noise above human comfort and necessities. Food and shelter, thus eating and sleeping are essential for survival. Listening to loud music isn’t. Now who is selfish? The party goer or the inhabitant? I think the buildings making loud vibration and noise should be equipped with strong isolation to avoid major inconvenience.

  • MRR

    You’re quite right to point out the issue of choices in this article. However, you fail to note that Le Divan Orange also has a choice: to abide by city by-laws and avoid fines. The citizens of Montreal have choices as well: To elect municipal representatives who put laws into effect that reflect their desires for the city. The inhabitants of Montreal have enacted this noise legislation through the democratic will. If Le Divan Orange doesn’t like the law, perhaps it can move to a different city? They decided to operate in Montreal; it’s not reasonable to move into a city with noise by-laws and then complain when you have to pay fines for breaking them.

  • Sash Boucicaut

    I lived on St. Laurent right above pine for 5 years. I lived in Old Montreal for another 5, lived at the edge of the village for 1 and currently live on St. Denis above Mt. Royal and have been here 8 years. I’ve heard all kinds of noise. Seen fights from my window on a regular basis, have heard drunken fools parade out of the bars at 3am yelling for no reason, seen lovers make out, watched people roll joints and snort coke openly on the sidewalks. The truth is, there’s a place for everything. That’s what makes a city. More importantly that’s what makes a city beautiful. It’s called diversity. I could live anywhere in the city but i choose to live despite it being a bit more expensive. You don’t live on St. Laurent for a “deal”. You choose to live there because it’s a hot spot, central, full of life, that same life that makes it often noisy and crowded. I have no sympathy for anyone who decides to live directly above, 2 stories above, across the street, or even 3 doors down from a bar. You want to live where people stream out at 3am after a shit-ton of drinks, then you’ll have to sacrifice some peace for it. It’s simple. You want peace and quiet, move one block east to St. Dom or west to clark.

    I’m sick of places that have been around for decades providing us with memorable moments, great music, laughs, and drinks having to close down because people think the world revolves around them. This is becoming more and more common and it’s scary. There’s a sense of entitlement growing within people that is becoming problematic. So, another 10 years from now, there’ll be no live music played past what, 9pm? Is that acceptable? Where does it stop? Common sense is all that is being advocated here. If you have issues sleeping with noise, choose the places that accommodate that. And I’m sorry, this is not at ALL the same as living near the train tracks. This is NOT the same as living near an airport. No one WANTS to live near the airport, but it’s affordable and they understand that that comes at a price. Should they have the right to complain to the airport authorities? Hell no. The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few or in this case, the one. I’m not ok with a bunch of entitled rich snobs moving to the plateau for it’s “status” only to become the source of its downfall as an entertainment and cultural center. There are plenty of quiet status areas for them. Yes, i’m generalizing, but the point is, don’t be a douche.

  • http://www.satanismymaster.com/ Dept of Redundancy Department

    Interesting rant. This topic hits close to home for me. When I was in University I lived above a bar that occasionally had acoustic music acts. No big deal I could sleep though them no problem. Then the bar switched format and started hosting amplified rock acts every night of the week that rendered my apartment unliveable. Since affordable accommodations near campus where scarce I had signed a lengthy lease and being a broke student at the time I could not afford to break my lease or move and the largely uncaring landlord who owned the building was of little help. Finally after a couple months of being unable to sleep until after 2am I called the city and the liquor licensing people and they made the bar owner soundproof his ceiling. Something he should have done in the first place when switching to loud amplified music. I kind of felt like a jerk but as the by-law people explained to me that sleep deprivation is actually a very real and quantifiable health risk. Not sure how it works in Montreal but in most jurisdictions in Canada the bylaw and liquor license folks would side with the residential tenant any day of the week on this one. But ya if the bar is already a rocking live music venue then maybe moving upstairs isn’t a good idea if you value sleep.

  • ml

    I am salivating over the eventual closure of this dunce hole.

  • Julie Demers

    Well… I guess you cant judge without knowing the situation. My best friend lives on top of a bar/caffe .Slept at her place many times in the past 7 years. Only for the past year the bar downstairs started playing live musics, louder music than usual. Sometimes in the middle of the week. Sometimes at 8 in the morning (the staff likes to hear music really loud before their shift)

    This is hell. Loud music from 8am to 3am. But never had a problem the 6 years before.
    the fact is its possible for owners to play they music reasonably. And landlords will always need to rent the space.